UKGBC to host 5-day online Living Building Challenge discussion

The UKGBC have announced that as part of this year’s pinpoint discussion series they will be running a number of sessions on the Living Building Challenge

The discussion will start on 3 February with a look at the Living Building Challenge (LBC) accreditation and performance standard for sustainable buildings. Members will be weighing in with their opinions on this progressive rating system that has an underlying sustainability philosophy which incorporates advocacy and governance. Members are also welcome to join in a tweet chat on Thursday 6 February with Amanda Sturgeon, VP of the International Living Futures Institute, developers of the LBC as well as Martin Brown and Claire Bowles of the LBC UK Collaborative. For those interested in learning more about the LBC, check out the supported events section for training days in Leeds (5 February) and London (28 February). UK-GBC members can take advantage of a substantial discount. 

 About the Living Building Challenge

 The Living Building Challenge is a green building certification programme that defines measures of sustainability in the built environment.

The Challenge is comprised of seven performance areas, or ‘Petals’: Site, Water, Energy, Health, Materials, Equity and Beauty. Petals are subdivided into a total of twenty Imperatives, each of which focuses on a specific sphere of influence. This compilation of Imperatives can be applied to almost every conceivable Typology, or project type, be it a building (both renovation of an existing structure, or new construction), infrastructure, landscape or community development.

Constructing Excellence – why you should get involved

By Duncan Reed, Tekla & Green Vision Ambassador

I missed the Green Vision December conference as I was attending a Constructing Excellence meeting.

Firstly I have to admit that I wasn’t really aware of Constructing Excellence until about a year or so ago – is that just another example of how many organisations there are that exist to ‘support’ construction so that it can be hard to see the wood for the trees? But that is another blog all of its own I suspect.

From the ‘About Us’ Constructing Excellence webpage:

Constructing Excellence http://www.constructingexcellence.org.uk/ is the single organisation charged with driving the change agenda in construction. We exist to improve industry performance in order to produce a better built environment. We are a cross-sector, cross-supply chain, member led organisation operating for the good of industry and its stakeholders.

Our Pedigree

In the mid-nineties a wide spread recognition arose of the need for the construction industry to improve the service it provided to its clients while also ensuring future viability for the wide range of organisations that operated in the industry.

In response to Sir Michael Latham’s 1994 report ‘Constructing the Team’ and Sir John Egan’s 1998 report ‘Rethinking Construction’ a number of cross industry bodies were formed to drive change. These included:

  • Reading Construction Forum
  • Design Build Foundation
  • Construction Best Practice Programme
  • Movement for Innovation
  • Local Government Task Force
  • Rethinking Construction
  • Be
  • Constructing Excellence
  • Construction Clients’ Group

Significant progress has been made in driving these initiatives into the practicing industry with many examples of projects that have been run in accordance with the fundamental principles.

In order to streamline the effort involved, all the above cross industry bodies were united as Constructing Excellence in 2003 to form a powerful, influential voice for improvement in the built environment sector.

Anyway, the meeting I attended – the CE Sustainability Group – was my second and another really interesting event with a very wide range of construction professionals present – the Highways Agency, an architect from Faulkner Brown, contractors Balfour Beatty and Skanska, manufacturers Knauf and Polypipe, myself representing Tekla, WRAP and the BRE and this is the key reason why CE events are so successful. Each person brought their own sustainability experiences and shared these in an open and wide ranging day’s discussion. Amongst other subjects we discussed were

  • Feedback from the CE National Convention held on 15th November 2013 including how CE is responding the Government Industrial Strategy Construction 2025
  • How the G4C – Generation for Collaboration group can realise change in businesses – and, yes, another new construction group for me
  • Strategies for linking this CE group to the regional CE Best Practice clubs – now these I had heard of thanks to Green Vision
  • The debate currently underway as to whether the UK housing market has the appetite to actually deliver housing that can achieve Code 5 or 6 certification.
  • The future of WRAP
  • The ICR – Infrastructure Carbon Review – and how the HA are responding to this
  • BS 8895-1:2013 Designing for material efficiency in building projects. Code of practice for Strategic Definition and Preparation and Brief. An invitation from WRAP for CE members to join the committee developing this standard
  • PAS 2070:2012 Specification for the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions of a city by direct plus supply chain, and consumption-based approaches. A document, developed by the Greater London Authority, to assess scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions
  • An embodied carbon database, produced by Arup and being developed as a tool by WRAP

As you can see, a huge amount of information was shared and discussed, from specific details to national strategies and lots of internet searches and further reading for me.

The meeting was rounded off with a lively Pecha Kucha session with myself, Lorna Stork of Knauf, Sandy Mackay from the BRE and Geri Smith of Balfour Beatty all talking ‘against the clock’ on the subject “What does sustainability mean to me/my organisation”.

So why this blog? Well quite simply as a sales pitch for everyone involved in construction to find out more about Constructing Excellence and to get involved. There are numerous specialist groups within CE looking at Construction Clients Group, G4C (Generation for Change), International, Asset Management, BIM, Collaborative Working Champions, Funding & Finance , Housing, Infrastructure, Nuclear, Social Media, Sustainability, Water Sector benchmarking and Clients’ Health & Safety so something for everyone to get involved with.

The next CE Sustainability Group meeting, on 20th March, will be all around the subject of Green BIM. See you there!!

#GVis Sustainable Materials: Healthy Buildings

Over 40 construction professionals gathered at Green Vision as we kick started our autumn series at Squires Sanders, 2 Park Lane in Leeds yesterday evening, in collaboration with the regional Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers. ‘Healthy Buildings’ was the focus, with an excellent panel of speakers covering the health drivers for sustainable material selection, importance of material selection in driving health improvements in hospitals, schools and offices and some startling research findings presented on evidence of health issues as a result of VOCs in building materials.

Chris Hayes of Skanska presented their ‘Color Palette’ and its application as a tool for one of their projects; the Karolinska Hosptial. Eddie Murphy of Mott MacDonald made a plea for engaging the User and Evidence Based Design as a means to creating better, healthy workplaces and environments. Dejan Mumovic presented a compelling case for an increase in air quality research.

Chris Hayes gave an overview of Skanska’s approach to green building introducing their ‘Color Palette’ and highlighting some impressive materials vetting from toxicity to life cycle impacts being used on the Karolinska Hospital project in Sweden. Chris stressed the importance of an intelligent client and supply chains in reaching ‘deep green’, and indicated that Skanska had pulled out of the USA Chamber of Commerce due to a clash of ethics with their stance on LEED materials, certainly evidence of an organisation standing by its green values.

Eddie shared his experience on Vulcan House and 2 St. Pauls as to the satisfaction levels of the end users of the building and advocated putting the user at the centre of design to over come the User performance gap. Reference was made to the work by Dr. Kerstin Sailor on ‘The generative Building’ and how a building can generate better social exchanges and more productive workplaces as well as enhance and improve the organization working within it. The key message was that in order to understand a building it is necessary to understand the clients, their business and the way in which the building will be used… Perhaps clients would pay more for POE’s if they could see the direct benefit in terms of improved business for them.

Last, but by no means least, was Dejan Mumovic from UCL who shared some of his research findings on air quality within schools in central London.
Schools pose a complex design challenge as they need to perform well over wide range of environmental issues and as children are much more vulnerable to air born pollutants. Dejan showed some striking European figures where the UK is ranked as one of the highest for Asthma in school across Europe. Dejan presented evidence emerging from the European SINPHONIE project, (Schools Indoor Pollution and Health: Observatory Network in Europe) across 22 countries; a complex research project covering the areas of health, environment, transport and climate change, aimed at improving air quality in schools and kindergartens. Evidence captured on two urban London schools (Victorian vs. Modern) linked building design and performance in terms of air quality, to health issues in children. In the heating season, temp ranges from 20-25 indicating overheating in schools, and were also identified as being linked to increases in dermal symptoms and oral symptoms in children.  One key design tip for designers was not to put carpets over under-floor heating, as this results in a breeding ground for bacteria.

A lively Q and A followed covering a variety of issues such as lack of VOC standards, a need for designers to move away from using BREEAM as a design guide, evidence of a growing interest in this area by the Healthcare industry and a need to demonstrate cost savings to Heathcare organizations through designing and delivering healthy buildings, all relevant and topical to construction and the healthy buildings agenda.

Construction21EXPO – the first virtual tradeshow for Green Buildings for the whole of EUROPE!

The “business case” for green buildings is understood by many of Europe’s leading project developers. Now we need to quickly enable design, construction and management teams to deliver the expected results for green new construction and renovation projects.

Construction21EXPO will bring together, in a cost efficient manner, green building investors, designers, solution providers and the many other important stakeholders in a two day virtual expo; saving money and eliminating travel time and associated carbon emissions with physical meetings.

UK_collaborative_logo

We are delighted that the UK LBC COLLABORATIVE* is a key UK  partner in this exciting project that is  supported by Green Building Councils and Construction21 Chapters across Europe as well as many other expert organizations.

As such we can offer additional discounts on the Exhibitor fees, but be sure to obtain a discount code from us prior to registering.

Watch the promotional video here  and download the Construction21EXPO_ Introduction for more information,  and do not hesitate to contact the EXPO team listed in the introduction document with any questions.

The UK LBC COLLABORATIVE is driving Living Building Challenge awareness in the UK and is hosted by the Leeds Sustainability Institute, Green Vision, Fairsnape, CKE and Be2camp.

Exciting New Collaboration Announced

We’re delighted to announce a new collaboration with John Pike, founder and Managing Director of 40 Percent Symposium, the conference that is making sustainability mainstream in Commercial Real Estate.

Green Vision, our Leeds Sustainability Institute Knowledge Exchange Network is delighted to be working with John Pike who will be chairing our ‘Building Transparency’ event at Squires Sanders in Leeds next week.

40 Percent Symposium are a conference to be reckoned who provide an insight into the issues, legislation and what the best companies are doing to make their commercial building stock more sustainable with fantastic industry speakers who are owners of large property portfolios, property investors, retailers ,pension funds and developers. A perfect match for our Green Vision Network who continue to update, inform and connect construction professionals sharing case studies, practical experience and knowledge of Sustainability in the Built Environment.

John will be our formidable chair for our evening event on Wednesday 12th June in Leeds which is inspired by the topic of ‘Transparency’ of products, processes, data and buildings and will feature Nick Katz of Honest Buildings, Paul Wilkinson of PWCom and Stella Kenway of Reprisk. We expect a good turnout and the usual excellent hospitality of our hosts Squires Sanders and look forward to an enjoyable evening of discussion, debate and networking. See booking information here

Green Vision Half-day Conference

This blog piece is brought to you by Duncan Reed, formerly of Balfour Beatty.

Duncan is a sustainability advocate with experience drawn from a career delivering schemes in a variety of market sectors as a Principal Contractor. As a sustainability champion he works to ensure that good practice and transparency is used to make a difference in the communities and to leave a positive legacy.

The spring season of Green Vision came to a fantastic end on Wednesday 17th April with the half day conference Demystifying Green Buildings. There was a venue change this time with hosts WSP providing some great facilitates for the attendees.

Claire Bowles, Project Director for Construction Knowledge Exchange and powerhouse behind the event, opened the proceedings and introduced the chair for the day – Sophie Stephens, Head of Sustainability; Delivery and Development (@SophLS78)

The first speaker up was David Symons (@DavidSymons) from our hosts WSP. He gave a wonderfully animated overview of what we thought the 21st century was going to look like for people living in the 1950s and proved the analogy that the major trends will may often be right the details can be a little off – yes where are our personal flying cars? He outlined three large changes, mega trends, which are facing the world as it strives to become more sustainable.

  1. Resources will be much more expensive than today – David highlighted the challenges faced by big business – the amount of timber IKEA consumes a year on one hand (an area the size of Switzerland!!)  yet how Interface is making carpets out of old fishing nets in the Philippines
  2. Technology will change how we work – and in what type of building. This one really caught my attention. The various levels of productivity between office and home working. We all need to interact with other people but don’t necessarily need to travel into the office. Yet home working is less efficient in terms of energy use! David cited the really novel idea of working hubs – effectively multi firm hot desking – being created above train station in the Netherlands. They looked great with the added bonus of trains outside the windows too! 
  3. A future of equals, a shift from a one size fits all approach to business to a future that is bespoke to the customer preference.

Following on from David was John Alker, Director of Policy & Communications at the UK Green Building Council (@johnalker) John took us all for a brisk walk through the current policy changes happening in relation to sustainability in the UK. There were many challenges to the delegates themselves –

  • How green do we think the coalition really is?
  • Are we supporting Green for Growth?
  • Is our professional Institution supporting the Building Magazine campaign

John finished up with a heads up of what’s coming next –

  • Part L: May
  • Housing Standards Review: May
  • Green Deal plan numbers: June
  • Allowable solutions: July
  • Energy audits: Summer
  • RHI: Summer
  • MEPs: Autumn

But my favourite bit was the slide from the USGBC conference. During the presentation from the head of the USGBC the back drop said – We Are Right. Powerful words but ones we should be using too.

Both keynotes gave us some great insights and powerful thoughts for us to consider across the rest of the afternoon sessions.

The first roundtable session I sat in was led by Jason Richards from WSP.

Jason outlined the WSP tool ReValue but conversation soon moved into a healthy discussion covering how to define levels of refurbishment (with the view that in reality there were many levels of granularity) the important need to start with a real conversation with the customer as to what was best value for them in the context of refurbishment and yet again how to unlock greater in use benefits by moving operational expenditure to support capital works. A lively debate thanks to representatives from Skanska, Race Cottam, Bottle Alley Glass, DTZ and Balfour Beatty among others.

The second roundtable I sat in Green Deal perspectives, led by Martin Brown (@fairsnape).

6 in group.

Martin highlighted how important the Green Deal is to sustainability and how it is as much to do with changing behaviour as reducing energy consumption. In the UK a huge chuck of energy use is from domestic sector but the Green Deal also is designed to combat UK fuel poverty, which is one of the highest in Europe. He also described how there are knock on effects to that people in fuel poverty are often found to be living in unhealthy buildings too. However the group was also reminded that the Green deal is fundamentally a financial model and needs to be considered this way with repayments against loans made through the property, via the meter in a very well controlled and regulated market.

The group discussed the confusion between Assessors, Providers (PM), Installers and how this was changing supply chain dynamics as well as concerns with the scheme around the thoroughness of the assessment, the use of the building and dealing with behavioural change. In many cases warmer homes meant people just wore less rather than turned the heating down! There is also evidence that as heating costs reduce overall energy sots do not as electrical costs increase.

The discussion moved onto the commercial application of the Green Deal. This is already possible, which was a surprise to much of our group. Applying the Green Deal could have major implications to the retrofit market, not just for customers and designers but also for FM providers. Lots of food for thought.

We all then gathered back into the main room for feedback from all the roundtable sessions. In addition the two sessions I attended there were two other roundtables discussions that fed back to the main group.

Financing Low Carbon Retrofit, by Christoph Harwood of Marksman Consulting.

Christoph was asking whether there are barriers to arranging finance for renewables, equipment or fabric upgrade for a building. The group found that there were different options regardless of the buildingwith it more being down to the  occupier and/or tenant, and their financing needs and strategies. With the many ways to secure finance (on balance sheet, off balance sheet, ESCO, Green deal etc) there should be no reason not to finance building retrofit.  Non-financial barriers are often bigger issues.

Better things to spend your money on, by Colin Robertson of NG Bailey.

Colin took another view on possible market barriers, centred on financial, technical and operational issues. If property as an investment is not performing well then refurbishment can be high on agenda and investing in buildings can be better for softer benefits too. In short owners need to be more aware of opportunities and the challenge was set on how to may owners and occupiers more aware..

Next up on the bill was our international speaker, Amanda Sturgeon from the Living Building Challenge. https://ilbi.org/lbc  Amanda is their Vice President and several of the audience had been lucky enough to see her present in London 3rd April (for more details of this event see http://fairsnape.com/2013/04/04/introducing-the-living-building-challenge-in-the-uk/ ).  Thanks to some technical wizardry by Martin Brown the link was made and Amanda was able to speak to the room directly from Seattle.

Today she was sharing a case study on the Bullitt Centre, Seattle, which Amanda and her colleagues moved in to 4 weeks ago as the new home for Living Building Challenge.

Amanda described the highlights of their new building and how is met the seriously challenging requirements to be Living Building certified.

  • No parking provided. Bus line, car share, light rail.
  • Net zero energy despite being located in the most limited solar resource in US.
  • The 244kW array on the roof, still bigger than the footprint of the building but sized based on an overall 83% reduction in energy requirements through the overall design process.
  • Using daylight factor to reduce energy needs. Pretty much 100% day lighting that can be can be used.
  • Net Zero water. A 52000 gallon cistern has been provided with rainwater for potable uses. The team lobbied the local authorities to change potable water use, and to get a grey water infiltration agreement. The latter was resolved by a 400sqft bio-mediation field, a 2nd level roof garden and by a sidewalk infiltration bed.
  • No black water treatment, all dealt with by the use of composting toilets with ten composting bins in basement where the residue is used as fertiliser.
  • Health and community. Irresistible stair – big and best views to persuade people use them rather than elevators.
  • Workstations within 30ft of windows, which are openable.
  • Triple gazed Schuco windows that weren’t previously available in the US. New workshop created in Seattle by supplier Goldfinch that can now deliver this system elsewhere in the US.

Materials.

Amanda described how they avoided materials on the red list. This list of 14 banned materials leads to a longer list of 362 chemicals that are not permitted under the Challenge.

https://ilbi.org/lbc/LBC%20Documents/lbc-2.1

The project challenged suppliers to go further with chemical transparency and more sustainable souring. For example dry wall materials were normally sourced in Mexico but the team found a  supplier in British Columbia that meant that the impact of these materials was greatly reduced. It was not without complication but could be done and proved that by challenging and tracking it is possible to achieve better results. Don’t accept the norm.

Amanda finished up by answering questions from the delegates back in Leeds.

  1. How much was the building design determined by building physics? Yes – thermal solar gain was reviewed in detail and the building was extensively modelled shading, blinds. The Centre faces west, typical for building in Seattle, but a challenge to the design.  There were extensive studies on the envelope too which helped them achieve the massive reduction in energy load. (the Bullitt Centre also complies with Passivhaus standards). Very tight envelope. However the biggest variable will be plug loads and this will be a challenge to try to keep on track.
  2. What is in place to monitor the building? Research will continue and is being studied by one tenant – Integrated Design Lab – a laboratory of University of Washington with other partners. The LVB are also designating a member of staff to monitor energy use too. For the next 12-18 months.
  3. How is the building heated? Electrical under floor heating with a small amount of domestic hot water. No combustion is allowed under the Living Building Challenge.

The audience was also reminded that there is now a Living Building Collaborative in Leeds (@UK_LBC). This is being managed jointly by Leeds Sustainability Institute  and Fairsnape.

After this thought provoking presentation the delegates were treated to two very different Pecha Kucha sessions. For those who haven’t seen this format there are just two rules – 20 slides and they auto advance every 20 seconds.

First up was Phillipa Ashbee from Glass Bottle Alley.

Phillipa showcased her business that makes recycled glass into anything from worktops, splash backs, place mats and coasters to furniture and external envelope panels – in fact pretty much anything in glass. What makes Glass Bottle Alley unique is that they fuse their crushed glass in a kiln so there is not resin added, the product is 100% and can be recycled again if necessary without any loss of quality. Phillipa showed some fantastic images both commercial and domestic with novel uses such as backlighting or colour change LEDs to further enhance their product.

The second presentation was from Martin Brown and focussed on the opportunities and the risks associated with the Green Deal.

The Green Deal is a finance model, a personal finance initiative. But there is a risk of the perfect storm of -

the untrained selling unsuitable to the uninformed

Whilst Martin agreed that energy use is very important he noted that we count solve today’s problems with the thinking that created them in the first place, we can’t just  be less bad and cited why the Living Building Challenge is so good.

The delegates were challenged how to think differently? But still being collaborative.

 Every time you make the right decision for the environment you make a profit.

Yves Chouinard.

 So what is the Green Vision network going to take from today? Some of the key points that came out in the final open discussions were

  • More information and advice on the Living Building Challenge. Materials, healthy products.
  • A broader view of sustainability, not just energy focussed.
  • .Project examples. Exemplar projects.
  • How monitor and feedback.
  • Honest appraisal of the buildings in use.
  • Sharing that knowledge.
  • It’s more than the design. Think about in the round. Not legislation driver but a business opportunity.
  • Howe do we get people to think longer term, 5,10,15 years of building in flexibility. Get owners and occupiers to understand this first.
  • Landlords making places as a destination. Not throwing everything away bit building virtuous circles.
  • Recycled content information. Is there information or a database out there?

So after an other useful, interesting and undoubtedly challenging afternoon Sophie brought the proceeding to an end with thanks to all the speakers, the organisers and the delegates.

See you all at the next event – Green Vision are presenting at GreenBuild on May 8th and then the next twilight seminar will be focussing on ‘Building Transparency ‘ on June 12th.

Greenvision and Fairsnape launch the Living Building Challenge UK Collaborative

Martin Brown, Fairsnape, and Claire Bowles, Greenvision at Leeds Sustainability Institute, have launched a UK Collaborative for the Living Building Challenge (LBC) with events planned throughout 2013 including awareness and training sessions led by Amanda Sturgeon VP of LBC., currently planned for 3rd April.

The purpose of a UK collaborative is to create a platform for like-thinking built environment sustainability professionals, who, as LBC ambassadors, can explore and increase awareness of LBC in the UK and, in time, provide support and assessment services for UK clients and buildings looking to LBC accrediatation. The creation of a UK LBC Collaborative is also in memory of Mel Starrs, a passionate sustainability professional who inspired many, and was very keen to see the LBC established in the UK.
Read the full article in Greenbuild news at the link below

Leeds Sustainability Institute at Ecobuild 2013

By Professor Chris Gorse, Director of the Leeds Sustainability Institute

Having been invited to speak and take part in the “Making sustainable construction happen, Green for growth reality check” session at EcoBuild 2013, I was asked to join a panel discussion in the Arena with Rt Hon Michael Fallon, Minister for Business and Enterprise.

The host was none other than Jonathon Dimbleby, who drew out a balanced debate on the challenges that are facing the industry and the measures necessary to build confidence and start to move the industry from the grips of recession.  Other panel members included  Mike Putnam, Chief Executive of Skanska UK and Co-Chair Green Construction Board  and Rhian Kelly, Director for business environment at the CBI.

While positive statements were made, clearly the challenge of delivering buildings takes much more than words, we need action from both the policy makers and industry. Yet, I do see some signs that the industry is starting to get to grips with the gap between theory and reality and what it needs to do in terms of research if it is to gain confidence in those that are investing in green construction.

I still argue for a fabric first approach, get it right and we can adequately service and build smart interfaces that are dynamic enough to respond to the environment and user needs.  The Green Deal Trial that we are undertaking in Leeds will also give us a greater understanding of what can be achieved with the existing building stock.  As far less than 1% of our current buildings meet nearly zero or passive standards, almost all of our existing buildings need an eco upgrade. If we can build confidence that is a lot of buildings for the industry to develop.

Closer to Zero – Green Vision Seminar 13 February

The recent snow, disruptive weather and congested roads turned the planned Green Vision seminar into an intimate evening at Squires Sanders last Wednesday evening.  Sue Riddlestone , OBE, founder and CEO of Bioregional, along with Dr Craig Jones principal sustainability consultant at Sustain Ltd, shared their experience and learning from the Olympics Games 2012 .

Sue described the meaning concepts behind the One Planet Living ten principles, based on the need to re-address the balance of consumption behaviour on our planet. The OPL is focused on making sustainability simple – through addressing ecological footprints – leading to a more informed holistic approach based around the ten principles

Sue currently lives and works in the bedzed zero carbon development which has achieved excellent results although at an above average build cost. The One Brighton project however was built on the OPL principles  at normal build costs and sold twice as fast a BedZed. It has also created a vibrant hub where people are happy with their sustainable lifestyles, proving that it is possible to build sustainable developments  with much improved health and community benefits without additional costs.

The ‘One Planet Olympics ‘ is an excellent example that led to huge savings in material costs through recycle and reuse strategies alongside the purchasing of materials & systems ‘on lease’ and returning them after the Olympic Games. A demonstration of Circular Economy thinking!

As the London Sustainable development commissioner , Sue was given access to the consultants on the Olympics project thanks to Ken Livingstone who provided the leadership for Bioregional influence with their ambitious sustainability strategy – the Greenest Games Ever – at the bidding  stage.  Of course , no one ever really thought the UK would win the Olympics , but when we did, the ambitious strategy became a legally binding document of the ‘One Planet Olympics’

Sue stressed the importance of contracts , strict guidance over reuse of buildings and materials from dismantled buildings on the site . Whilst there were no embodied carbon targets for the games there were strict reuse targets as there was a huge drive to dematerialise buildings. Innovative novation approaches were used such as take back schemes for air conditioning systems .

Sue summarised by giving two take away key principles:

  1. leadership and commitment to a sustainable project no matter how big ,
  2. embodied carbon must also be considered alongside health and well being.

Sue described the current environment as a clunky gear change into a more resource efficient environment.

Next, Dr. Craig Jones gave a detailed account of embodied carbon, its meaning and its impact at this time of huge growth of GHG emissions explaining the difference between embodied carbon and whole life carbon.

Embodied carbon mainly comes from energy and is also known as the carbon footprint of a material. It considers energy consumed to process, transport and fabricate a product. Taking us through the ‘cradle to gate’ approach and then further to ‘cradle to site’ including powering onsite, assembly equipment and construction waste. Managing construction waste is effective but buying less materials would be the most efficient saving to be made.

Craig indicated a few culprits such as bricks and cement in concrete as materials that could be replaced by lower carbon alternatives. In particular he drilled down into the detail of the cement low carbon substitute products (Ggbs and pfa) which were used in the Olympic Park and some of the resistance to using such materials n construction projects being down to lack of understanding and the impact on schedule of a longer curing time.

The key message from Craig was that Embodied carbon, once it’s emitted, it’s gone and we can never go back and improve the embodied carbon, its irrecoverable.

GVis members posed some interesting questions around the WRAP net waste tool which has a lack of up to date data and the open access nature of the university o f Bath embodied Carbon materials database (which is currently seeking funding to sustain maintenance and upkeep)Recommended resources from the event:

Best foot forward report 

Bath Embodied  Carbon Database 

SKA rating guidance 

Better Buildings Partnerships Guidance 

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Notes from Claire Bowles Green Vision and Martin Brown Fairsnape

Green Vision Book Chat #GVischat 10th Dec

For our last Green Vision tweetchat of 2012 we will be exploring Cradle to Cradle by William McDonough and Michael Braungart

In a slight departure from our usual tweetchat style we would really like to know your thoughts on the book, your favourite quotes and take aways as well as your thoughts on Cradle to Cradle thinking in general.

In addition this is an opportunity to share and promote your experiences of Cradle to Cradle. Perhaps you are a manufacturer applying or accredited to Cradle to Cradle, or an architect, client or builder adopting C2C thinking on your projects.

Join us, 8pm GMT Monday 10th December - Virtual non fattening mince pies included!

Cradle to Cradle Book

As usual the tweetchat hashtag is #GVischat and will be hosted by Claire @clairecke at Green Vision and facilitated by Martin @fairsnape. Finally, don’t forget our Green Vision half day conference on Sustainable Materials that will feature Cradle to Cradle keynote on the 12th December in Leeds and online