JUST: a social justice label for construction …

Taking built environment sustainability deeper into the responsibility agenda, the International Living Future Institute are launching (Oct 2013) a new and important transparency initiative for the built environment to sit along side the Living Building Challenge and Declare. Just will provide clients, specifiers and procurers with ‘a view of how participating organisations treat their employees and where they invest their profits’

Just will cover the important areas of gender and ethnic diversity, salary equity, gender pay equity, community involvement, responsible investing and more, taking it beyond other programmes in the built environment sector. (And arguably areas that the UK Considerate Constructors Scheme should be addressing?)

The Press Release from ILFI reads:

In today’s global economy, it’s difficult to know what your consumer dollars are really supporting. JUST gives you an insider’s view of how participating organisations treat their employees and where they invest their profits. JUST works seamlessly with the International Living Future Institute’s Declare™ materials label and the next iteration of the Living Building Challenge™ (Version 3.0 — coming spring 2014).

By providing participating companies with a clear, elegant and informative equity ‘nutrition-label’, JUST aims to transform the marketplace through transparency and open communication. It aligns with the Institute’s Declare™ materials label to provide a holistic picture of both the products a company produces and the human story behind those products.
To participate in this voluntary disclosure program, an organization must submit documentation that asks for in-depth information about twenty distinct aspects of workplace equity and justice.
We’ll be launching the JUST label and searchable database FALL 2013. Join us in this critical initiative!
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Living Building Challenge Infographic

Spotted this excellent infographic explaining the Living Building Challenge recently covered on Treehugger

“The Living Building Challenge is the toughest green standard out there, but it is seriously gaining traction as people get to understand it”

Lloyd Alter writes “Skanska prepared what they call an infographic to help explain the Living Building Challenge. It’s not really; it is more like a Powerpoint presentation glued together, light on non-verifiable numbers, heavy on written content. It is the most concise summary of the LBC that I have seen yet”

Skanska_Living_Building_Final.jpg.492x0_q85_crop-smart

We are currently preparing the fist UK Living Building Challenge newsletter with exciting news, events, workshops, client interest and possibly the first UK registered LBC project!  To ensure you receive a copy follow @UK_LBC on twitter, leave a comment here or email us.

Exciting New Collaboration Announced

We’re delighted to announce a new collaboration with John Pike, founder and Managing Director of 40 Percent Symposium, the conference that is making sustainability mainstream in Commercial Real Estate.

Green Vision, our Leeds Sustainability Institute Knowledge Exchange Network is delighted to be working with John Pike who will be chairing our ‘Building Transparency’ event at Squires Sanders in Leeds next week.

40 Percent Symposium are a conference to be reckoned who provide an insight into the issues, legislation and what the best companies are doing to make their commercial building stock more sustainable with fantastic industry speakers who are owners of large property portfolios, property investors, retailers ,pension funds and developers. A perfect match for our Green Vision Network who continue to update, inform and connect construction professionals sharing case studies, practical experience and knowledge of Sustainability in the Built Environment.

John will be our formidable chair for our evening event on Wednesday 12th June in Leeds which is inspired by the topic of ‘Transparency’ of products, processes, data and buildings and will feature Nick Katz of Honest Buildings, Paul Wilkinson of PWCom and Stella Kenway of Reprisk. We expect a good turnout and the usual excellent hospitality of our hosts Squires Sanders and look forward to an enjoyable evening of discussion, debate and networking. See booking information here

Green Vision Half-day Conference

This blog piece is brought to you by Duncan Reed, formerly of Balfour Beatty.

Duncan is a sustainability advocate with experience drawn from a career delivering schemes in a variety of market sectors as a Principal Contractor. As a sustainability champion he works to ensure that good practice and transparency is used to make a difference in the communities and to leave a positive legacy.

The spring season of Green Vision came to a fantastic end on Wednesday 17th April with the half day conference Demystifying Green Buildings. There was a venue change this time with hosts WSP providing some great facilitates for the attendees.

Claire Bowles, Project Director for Construction Knowledge Exchange and powerhouse behind the event, opened the proceedings and introduced the chair for the day – Sophie Stephens, Head of Sustainability; Delivery and Development (@SophLS78)

The first speaker up was David Symons (@DavidSymons) from our hosts WSP. He gave a wonderfully animated overview of what we thought the 21st century was going to look like for people living in the 1950s and proved the analogy that the major trends will may often be right the details can be a little off – yes where are our personal flying cars? He outlined three large changes, mega trends, which are facing the world as it strives to become more sustainable.

  1. Resources will be much more expensive than today – David highlighted the challenges faced by big business – the amount of timber IKEA consumes a year on one hand (an area the size of Switzerland!!)  yet how Interface is making carpets out of old fishing nets in the Philippines
  2. Technology will change how we work – and in what type of building. This one really caught my attention. The various levels of productivity between office and home working. We all need to interact with other people but don’t necessarily need to travel into the office. Yet home working is less efficient in terms of energy use! David cited the really novel idea of working hubs – effectively multi firm hot desking – being created above train station in the Netherlands. They looked great with the added bonus of trains outside the windows too! 
  3. A future of equals, a shift from a one size fits all approach to business to a future that is bespoke to the customer preference.

Following on from David was John Alker, Director of Policy & Communications at the UK Green Building Council (@johnalker) John took us all for a brisk walk through the current policy changes happening in relation to sustainability in the UK. There were many challenges to the delegates themselves –

  • How green do we think the coalition really is?
  • Are we supporting Green for Growth?
  • Is our professional Institution supporting the Building Magazine campaign

John finished up with a heads up of what’s coming next –

  • Part L: May
  • Housing Standards Review: May
  • Green Deal plan numbers: June
  • Allowable solutions: July
  • Energy audits: Summer
  • RHI: Summer
  • MEPs: Autumn

But my favourite bit was the slide from the USGBC conference. During the presentation from the head of the USGBC the back drop said – We Are Right. Powerful words but ones we should be using too.

Both keynotes gave us some great insights and powerful thoughts for us to consider across the rest of the afternoon sessions.

The first roundtable session I sat in was led by Jason Richards from WSP.

Jason outlined the WSP tool ReValue but conversation soon moved into a healthy discussion covering how to define levels of refurbishment (with the view that in reality there were many levels of granularity) the important need to start with a real conversation with the customer as to what was best value for them in the context of refurbishment and yet again how to unlock greater in use benefits by moving operational expenditure to support capital works. A lively debate thanks to representatives from Skanska, Race Cottam, Bottle Alley Glass, DTZ and Balfour Beatty among others.

The second roundtable I sat in Green Deal perspectives, led by Martin Brown (@fairsnape).

6 in group.

Martin highlighted how important the Green Deal is to sustainability and how it is as much to do with changing behaviour as reducing energy consumption. In the UK a huge chuck of energy use is from domestic sector but the Green Deal also is designed to combat UK fuel poverty, which is one of the highest in Europe. He also described how there are knock on effects to that people in fuel poverty are often found to be living in unhealthy buildings too. However the group was also reminded that the Green deal is fundamentally a financial model and needs to be considered this way with repayments against loans made through the property, via the meter in a very well controlled and regulated market.

The group discussed the confusion between Assessors, Providers (PM), Installers and how this was changing supply chain dynamics as well as concerns with the scheme around the thoroughness of the assessment, the use of the building and dealing with behavioural change. In many cases warmer homes meant people just wore less rather than turned the heating down! There is also evidence that as heating costs reduce overall energy sots do not as electrical costs increase.

The discussion moved onto the commercial application of the Green Deal. This is already possible, which was a surprise to much of our group. Applying the Green Deal could have major implications to the retrofit market, not just for customers and designers but also for FM providers. Lots of food for thought.

We all then gathered back into the main room for feedback from all the roundtable sessions. In addition the two sessions I attended there were two other roundtables discussions that fed back to the main group.

Financing Low Carbon Retrofit, by Christoph Harwood of Marksman Consulting.

Christoph was asking whether there are barriers to arranging finance for renewables, equipment or fabric upgrade for a building. The group found that there were different options regardless of the buildingwith it more being down to the  occupier and/or tenant, and their financing needs and strategies. With the many ways to secure finance (on balance sheet, off balance sheet, ESCO, Green deal etc) there should be no reason not to finance building retrofit.  Non-financial barriers are often bigger issues.

Better things to spend your money on, by Colin Robertson of NG Bailey.

Colin took another view on possible market barriers, centred on financial, technical and operational issues. If property as an investment is not performing well then refurbishment can be high on agenda and investing in buildings can be better for softer benefits too. In short owners need to be more aware of opportunities and the challenge was set on how to may owners and occupiers more aware..

Next up on the bill was our international speaker, Amanda Sturgeon from the Living Building Challenge. https://ilbi.org/lbc  Amanda is their Vice President and several of the audience had been lucky enough to see her present in London 3rd April (for more details of this event see http://fairsnape.com/2013/04/04/introducing-the-living-building-challenge-in-the-uk/ ).  Thanks to some technical wizardry by Martin Brown the link was made and Amanda was able to speak to the room directly from Seattle.

Today she was sharing a case study on the Bullitt Centre, Seattle, which Amanda and her colleagues moved in to 4 weeks ago as the new home for Living Building Challenge.

Amanda described the highlights of their new building and how is met the seriously challenging requirements to be Living Building certified.

  • No parking provided. Bus line, car share, light rail.
  • Net zero energy despite being located in the most limited solar resource in US.
  • The 244kW array on the roof, still bigger than the footprint of the building but sized based on an overall 83% reduction in energy requirements through the overall design process.
  • Using daylight factor to reduce energy needs. Pretty much 100% day lighting that can be can be used.
  • Net Zero water. A 52000 gallon cistern has been provided with rainwater for potable uses. The team lobbied the local authorities to change potable water use, and to get a grey water infiltration agreement. The latter was resolved by a 400sqft bio-mediation field, a 2nd level roof garden and by a sidewalk infiltration bed.
  • No black water treatment, all dealt with by the use of composting toilets with ten composting bins in basement where the residue is used as fertiliser.
  • Health and community. Irresistible stair – big and best views to persuade people use them rather than elevators.
  • Workstations within 30ft of windows, which are openable.
  • Triple gazed Schuco windows that weren’t previously available in the US. New workshop created in Seattle by supplier Goldfinch that can now deliver this system elsewhere in the US.

Materials.

Amanda described how they avoided materials on the red list. This list of 14 banned materials leads to a longer list of 362 chemicals that are not permitted under the Challenge.

https://ilbi.org/lbc/LBC%20Documents/lbc-2.1

The project challenged suppliers to go further with chemical transparency and more sustainable souring. For example dry wall materials were normally sourced in Mexico but the team found a  supplier in British Columbia that meant that the impact of these materials was greatly reduced. It was not without complication but could be done and proved that by challenging and tracking it is possible to achieve better results. Don’t accept the norm.

Amanda finished up by answering questions from the delegates back in Leeds.

  1. How much was the building design determined by building physics? Yes – thermal solar gain was reviewed in detail and the building was extensively modelled shading, blinds. The Centre faces west, typical for building in Seattle, but a challenge to the design.  There were extensive studies on the envelope too which helped them achieve the massive reduction in energy load. (the Bullitt Centre also complies with Passivhaus standards). Very tight envelope. However the biggest variable will be plug loads and this will be a challenge to try to keep on track.
  2. What is in place to monitor the building? Research will continue and is being studied by one tenant – Integrated Design Lab – a laboratory of University of Washington with other partners. The LVB are also designating a member of staff to monitor energy use too. For the next 12-18 months.
  3. How is the building heated? Electrical under floor heating with a small amount of domestic hot water. No combustion is allowed under the Living Building Challenge.

The audience was also reminded that there is now a Living Building Collaborative in Leeds (@UK_LBC). This is being managed jointly by Leeds Sustainability Institute  and Fairsnape.

After this thought provoking presentation the delegates were treated to two very different Pecha Kucha sessions. For those who haven’t seen this format there are just two rules – 20 slides and they auto advance every 20 seconds.

First up was Phillipa Ashbee from Glass Bottle Alley.

Phillipa showcased her business that makes recycled glass into anything from worktops, splash backs, place mats and coasters to furniture and external envelope panels – in fact pretty much anything in glass. What makes Glass Bottle Alley unique is that they fuse their crushed glass in a kiln so there is not resin added, the product is 100% and can be recycled again if necessary without any loss of quality. Phillipa showed some fantastic images both commercial and domestic with novel uses such as backlighting or colour change LEDs to further enhance their product.

The second presentation was from Martin Brown and focussed on the opportunities and the risks associated with the Green Deal.

The Green Deal is a finance model, a personal finance initiative. But there is a risk of the perfect storm of -

the untrained selling unsuitable to the uninformed

Whilst Martin agreed that energy use is very important he noted that we count solve today’s problems with the thinking that created them in the first place, we can’t just  be less bad and cited why the Living Building Challenge is so good.

The delegates were challenged how to think differently? But still being collaborative.

 Every time you make the right decision for the environment you make a profit.

Yves Chouinard.

 So what is the Green Vision network going to take from today? Some of the key points that came out in the final open discussions were

  • More information and advice on the Living Building Challenge. Materials, healthy products.
  • A broader view of sustainability, not just energy focussed.
  • .Project examples. Exemplar projects.
  • How monitor and feedback.
  • Honest appraisal of the buildings in use.
  • Sharing that knowledge.
  • It’s more than the design. Think about in the round. Not legislation driver but a business opportunity.
  • Howe do we get people to think longer term, 5,10,15 years of building in flexibility. Get owners and occupiers to understand this first.
  • Landlords making places as a destination. Not throwing everything away bit building virtuous circles.
  • Recycled content information. Is there information or a database out there?

So after an other useful, interesting and undoubtedly challenging afternoon Sophie brought the proceeding to an end with thanks to all the speakers, the organisers and the delegates.

See you all at the next event – Green Vision are presenting at GreenBuild on May 8th and then the next twilight seminar will be focussing on ‘Building Transparency ‘ on June 12th.

A Green Vision for Social Media at Green Build Expo

logoBe2Camp returns to Greenbuild Expo in May with Green Vision.

This year’s session, taking place on 8th May at Manchester Central from 1pm, will be the most exciting  yet, with an amazing line-up of speakers (see below for programme).

GreenBuild Expo itself attracts over 4,000 built environment professionals and takes place on 8th and 9th May. It features over 100 free seminars and workshops on all aspects on sustainable buildings, from integrating renewable energy and BIM for beginners to skills for Green Deal and strategies for climate change adaptation. Speakers include UK Green Building Council, Energy Saving Trust, Warm Up North, Manchester City Council and many more. For free registration visit www.greenbuildexpo.co.uk.

Be2Green

The speakers will include some of the top presentations from Green Visions last three years’ programme, along with BE2 friends old and new. Join us for the whole afternoon, or one of the three great sessions we have planned.

1.00 Welcome

1.15 – 2.00 Green Knowledge – how social media can help us learn, share and advance green sustainability knowledge, including essential tips on promoting your green credentials

2.15 – 3.00 Green Materials – transparency in green and healthy materials, featuring presentation from Kelly Grainger, Interface and Philippa Ashbee from Bottle Glass Alley.

3.15 – 4.00 Green Futures – what’s emerging in the world of green building, featuring ‘Green Towns’’ Prof Angus McIntosh from Oxford Brooks University, and Paul Toyne, Global Head of Sustainability at WSP and a keynote live presentation from Amanda Sturgeon, VP Living Building Challenge, from the recently completed Bullitt Centre in Portland, called by many the greenest commercial building in the world (Not one to miss!).

Do you have something to share, Pecha Kucha style (thats 20 slides, each 20 seconds) that will fit one of the above sessions? We will keep one slot free for ‘on the day’ contribution But if you are interested please let the Greenbuild Expo organisers know in advance. (1st come, 1st served ….)

As in previous years, our afternoon session will be live streamed and web enabled allowing real global sharing from and into the event.

BE2 (Be2Camp) are Greenbuild Expo’’s social media partners, and a social media advocacy for built environment sustainability and collaborative working

Green Vision, part of the Leeds Sustainability Institute and Centre for Knowledge Exchange and committed to driving sustainable change for construction professionals

Demystifying Green Buildings

The transcript, Storify style,  of the excellent Green Vision half day conference can be read here

Catch up with the comments and tweets through the day, revisit presentations and explore the numerous links shared during the event. Also read through tweets and observations from the day’s round table discussions

  • Financing Low Carbon Retrofit
  • The Real Green Deal
  • Better things to spend your money on
  • The business case for commercial retrofit
  • Revalue – Assessing the Improvement Fundamentals of Buildings

A sample of the presentations delivered include: John Alker

and Amanda Sturgeon live from the Bullitt centre

#GVis Demystifying Green Buildings: The Opportunities of Retrofit

A packed out room of Construction professionals gathered for yesterday’s Green Vision seminar at Squires Sanders.  Nigel Banks, Group Sustainability Director for Keepmoat   gave a compelling presentation on the Green Deal and the current Governments’ approach to tackling Fuel Poverty. George Munson Energy and Climate Change Manager at Leeds City Council highlighted the excellent retrofit programmes being delivered by the Leeds City Region and the tangible energy savings and health benefits achieved by household residents. Whilst Karen Stafeckis, Area Manager for Turner and Townsend  discussed the process and business case for adopting low carbon retrofit projects in the public and private sectors.  .

Nigel titled his presentation somewhat tongue in cheek as ‘Selling Fuel Poverty’ highlighting the importance of fuel poverty as a key priority for government. Yet despite it being high on the government agenda we are currently in our first government since 1970 which does not have a government programme in place to tackle the issue of the fuel poor.  The Green Deal with its 7% interest rate could prove off-putting for poorer households, and fuel-poor consumers could miss out altogether. Nigel argued that the Green Deal will not stop fuel poverty rocketing as fuel prices rise.

Nigel advocated the importance of understanding and working solutions appropriate to the house and occupiers when looking to improve social housing stocks on a whole estate basis . He also emphasised the importance of these upgrades being offered at Low or no cost helping residents move out of extreme fuel poverty in tough times when fuel bills have tripled. Keepmoat have done extensive work and research around solutions and technologies and how they work together , delivering savings of up to 80% on carbon in some properties and demonstrating considerable cost savings to residents . Nigel said the Green Deal has excited the construction industry but it may only bring benefit and be appropriate for a tranche of the market with its 7% interest rates and can’t be seen as a solution to tackle Fuel Poverty as the bottom 20% may not even be eligible for the Green Deal finance.

George Munson shared Leeds City Councils learning of delivering the green deal in the Leeds City Region on the Green Deal Demonstrator programme which started in October 2012. The programme emerged following on from DEEP and Wrap upLeeds.LeedsCityregion agreed to collaborate for the 2.6 million green deal demonstrator programme involving a small framework of suppliers. The programme was set up with the primary aims of testing the green deal with a longer term agreement to work on a 3-8 year green deal programme  . This project was a test bed to investigate the appetite for loans and test the market for new niche housing types  of solid wall properties and hard to treat cavities. George indicated the first project of external insulation to 1960s properties as a real success with great take up and low impact in terms of intrusion and high impact in terms of comfort improvements. Great way to transform an estate. The second part to the demonstrator is testing the appetite for loans which when offered at 0% enquiries have been flooding in. There is a third element to the programme in the pipeline which will look at Victorian terraces where internal  insulation would not have been possible had the  Government not just released its new planning guidance whereby external wall insulation is permitted unless in listed buildings or conservation areas.  George brought his presentation to a close by drawing out key learning to date indicating an appetite for loans, an appetite from the market yet the need for an alternative to the Green Deal finance. Leeds City Region will be looking ahead to their long term Green Deal offer to deliver improvements on 450,000 properties over the next 3-8 years.

Karen Stafeckis shifted the focus of the evening from housing to an in-depth look at Retrofit of non domestic buildings , both Public and Private, highlighting the importance of optimising energy performance in existing occupied buildings. Karen saw social and economic pressure driving businesses towards the low carbon retrofit agenda change alongside increased movements around CSR and increased consumer demand for optimised buildings.  She delivered a clear message around the process of measurement, benchmarking, setting realistic energy targets and bundling of buildings to optimise paybacks.  Karen shared her experience of the Mayor of London’s public Sector initiative RE:FITwhich was first launched in 2008 and guarantees energy savings achieved through low carbon retrofit. 5 years into the scheme and it is achieving guaranteed savings typically up to 28% pa and payback periods typically less than seven years.   .

Karen concluded with discussion of the recently launched World Green Business Council’s ‘Business Case’for Green Buildings, and a strong message that optimising energy efficiency can deliver economic as well as environmental benefits.

GVis members posed some excellent questions around occupier behavior and its impact on the Green Deal. Also good points raised on multi occupancy buildings and a shift towards community heating systems. Green Deal finance was a hot topic as ever raising the questions around interest rates, saleable value of homes under the Green Deal.

Greenvision and Fairsnape launch the Living Building Challenge UK Collaborative

Martin Brown, Fairsnape, and Claire Bowles, Greenvision at Leeds Sustainability Institute, have launched a UK Collaborative for the Living Building Challenge (LBC) with events planned throughout 2013 including awareness and training sessions led by Amanda Sturgeon VP of LBC., currently planned for 3rd April.

The purpose of a UK collaborative is to create a platform for like-thinking built environment sustainability professionals, who, as LBC ambassadors, can explore and increase awareness of LBC in the UK and, in time, provide support and assessment services for UK clients and buildings looking to LBC accrediatation. The creation of a UK LBC Collaborative is also in memory of Mel Starrs, a passionate sustainability professional who inspired many, and was very keen to see the LBC established in the UK.
Read the full article in Greenbuild news at the link below

Leeds Sustainability Institute at Ecobuild 2013

By Professor Chris Gorse, Director of the Leeds Sustainability Institute

Having been invited to speak and take part in the “Making sustainable construction happen, Green for growth reality check” session at EcoBuild 2013, I was asked to join a panel discussion in the Arena with Rt Hon Michael Fallon, Minister for Business and Enterprise.

The host was none other than Jonathon Dimbleby, who drew out a balanced debate on the challenges that are facing the industry and the measures necessary to build confidence and start to move the industry from the grips of recession.  Other panel members included  Mike Putnam, Chief Executive of Skanska UK and Co-Chair Green Construction Board  and Rhian Kelly, Director for business environment at the CBI.

While positive statements were made, clearly the challenge of delivering buildings takes much more than words, we need action from both the policy makers and industry. Yet, I do see some signs that the industry is starting to get to grips with the gap between theory and reality and what it needs to do in terms of research if it is to gain confidence in those that are investing in green construction.

I still argue for a fabric first approach, get it right and we can adequately service and build smart interfaces that are dynamic enough to respond to the environment and user needs.  The Green Deal Trial that we are undertaking in Leeds will also give us a greater understanding of what can be achieved with the existing building stock.  As far less than 1% of our current buildings meet nearly zero or passive standards, almost all of our existing buildings need an eco upgrade. If we can build confidence that is a lot of buildings for the industry to develop.

Closer to Zero – Green Vision Seminar 13 February

The recent snow, disruptive weather and congested roads turned the planned Green Vision seminar into an intimate evening at Squires Sanders last Wednesday evening.  Sue Riddlestone , OBE, founder and CEO of Bioregional, along with Dr Craig Jones principal sustainability consultant at Sustain Ltd, shared their experience and learning from the Olympics Games 2012 .

Sue described the meaning concepts behind the One Planet Living ten principles, based on the need to re-address the balance of consumption behaviour on our planet. The OPL is focused on making sustainability simple – through addressing ecological footprints – leading to a more informed holistic approach based around the ten principles

Sue currently lives and works in the bedzed zero carbon development which has achieved excellent results although at an above average build cost. The One Brighton project however was built on the OPL principles  at normal build costs and sold twice as fast a BedZed. It has also created a vibrant hub where people are happy with their sustainable lifestyles, proving that it is possible to build sustainable developments  with much improved health and community benefits without additional costs.

The ‘One Planet Olympics ‘ is an excellent example that led to huge savings in material costs through recycle and reuse strategies alongside the purchasing of materials & systems ‘on lease’ and returning them after the Olympic Games. A demonstration of Circular Economy thinking!

As the London Sustainable development commissioner , Sue was given access to the consultants on the Olympics project thanks to Ken Livingstone who provided the leadership for Bioregional influence with their ambitious sustainability strategy – the Greenest Games Ever – at the bidding  stage.  Of course , no one ever really thought the UK would win the Olympics , but when we did, the ambitious strategy became a legally binding document of the ‘One Planet Olympics’

Sue stressed the importance of contracts , strict guidance over reuse of buildings and materials from dismantled buildings on the site . Whilst there were no embodied carbon targets for the games there were strict reuse targets as there was a huge drive to dematerialise buildings. Innovative novation approaches were used such as take back schemes for air conditioning systems .

Sue summarised by giving two take away key principles:

  1. leadership and commitment to a sustainable project no matter how big ,
  2. embodied carbon must also be considered alongside health and well being.

Sue described the current environment as a clunky gear change into a more resource efficient environment.

Next, Dr. Craig Jones gave a detailed account of embodied carbon, its meaning and its impact at this time of huge growth of GHG emissions explaining the difference between embodied carbon and whole life carbon.

Embodied carbon mainly comes from energy and is also known as the carbon footprint of a material. It considers energy consumed to process, transport and fabricate a product. Taking us through the ‘cradle to gate’ approach and then further to ‘cradle to site’ including powering onsite, assembly equipment and construction waste. Managing construction waste is effective but buying less materials would be the most efficient saving to be made.

Craig indicated a few culprits such as bricks and cement in concrete as materials that could be replaced by lower carbon alternatives. In particular he drilled down into the detail of the cement low carbon substitute products (Ggbs and pfa) which were used in the Olympic Park and some of the resistance to using such materials n construction projects being down to lack of understanding and the impact on schedule of a longer curing time.

The key message from Craig was that Embodied carbon, once it’s emitted, it’s gone and we can never go back and improve the embodied carbon, its irrecoverable.

GVis members posed some interesting questions around the WRAP net waste tool which has a lack of up to date data and the open access nature of the university o f Bath embodied Carbon materials database (which is currently seeking funding to sustain maintenance and upkeep)Recommended resources from the event:

Best foot forward report 

Bath Embodied  Carbon Database 

SKA rating guidance 

Better Buildings Partnerships Guidance 

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Notes from Claire Bowles Green Vision and Martin Brown Fairsnape