ThinkBIM

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Category: Behavioural change

Process, Case Study & a Red Kite: how SES is using BIM – Wednesday 1st March 17

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Not our most succinct event title but three linked presentations covering a good number of the current BIM issues. Originally we had hoped that CIBSE would present on the new BIMHawk tool that has been developed but at fairly short notice they had to pull out of presenting. But never ones to let a little thing like losing a speaker thinkBIM called upon its fantastic network of BIM professionals and immediately plugged the gap with Nick Tune, CEO of CoBuilder in the UK.

However to start the evening it was great to get a presentation and live demonstration from Gavin Dunstan, BIM Operations Manager from our series sponsors SES Engineering Services. Gavin shared a great overview of how SES Engineering Services have adopted BIM to suit their requirements as well as how they have progressed to embed more and more digital workflows into their businesses as well as using these to collaborate with their customers on projects.

For some reason live demonstrations often turn into a fraught strategy for presentations – in theory why would anything go wrong with the software you use all the time but for some reason adding in an audience into the same room and the software always seems to make things a bit more risky!! However, with his colleague Richard driving the laptop, Gavin’s demonstration of Autodesk BIM360 ran smoothly.

As mentioned at the top of this post our second speaker was Nick Tune, CEO of CoBuilder UK and a great data enthusiast. Nick is always good value and opened with a great slide of a TV remote – and perhaps what we really need them to do – with the opening question ‘What data do you need?’

Nick went on to give the audience a great overview on how to define, procure and confirm data in the BIM process using COBie, PLQs, PDTs, PDS and the LEXiCON project with the BRE.

This month’s twilight seminar was chaired by the good friend of thinkBIM, regional chair of CIBSE and major CPD logger – Simon Owen from Calibre Search. As well as keeping everything to time and asking some great questions he has also created a great Storify of our event too which can be viewed at the link below.

 

 

 

Success Stories and Data Security – 7th December 2016

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BIM for FM – still not quite there….

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Paul Wilkinson

Guest post by Paul Wilkinson, thinkBIM ambassador and Director, pwcom.co.uk Ltd

ThinkBIM focused on FM, and provided detailed pointers to FM professionals on both how to get involved with BIM, and why it makes commercial sense.

The latest ThinkBIM half-day conference (on 6 July at Squire Patton Boggs new offices in Leeds, and sponsored by Trimble and GroupBC) looked, once again, at the use of building information modelling by those working in facilities management, operations and maintenance for owner-operator organisations, and yet – on a show of hands – only a small handful of attendees were actually employed in FM. The day therefore repeatedly returned to what government and industry needs to do to get more FM professionals engaged with BIM.

Keynotes

The business case for BIM has been well made by the UK Government’s BIM Task Group since 2011, and regular ThinkBIM keynote speaker Deborah Rowland (currently director of FM at the Ministry of Justice) has been at the forefront in pushing the BIM for FM message in the public sector, citing Government Soft Landings (GSL). She underlined how asset management is fundamental to BIM-enabled project delivery, with client facilities managers involved from a project’s inception in helping to define the employer’s information requirements (EIR) and asset information management (AIM) needs.

PAS 1192-3 covering information management in the operational phase was published in March 2014, and since then advice, standards and protocols covering FM inputs to BIM and beyond have expanded. Deborah highlighted recent useful additions, notably a RICS-developed NRM3 dLCC (digital lifeycle cost) toolkit which aligns BIM with SFG20 maintenance information needs (more about SFG20 here). The MoJ’s BIM2AIM group also recently launched a suite of documents providing clear and concise instruction and guidance on how to define, procure and deliver Level 2 BIM projects (read BIM+ news).

The MoJ’s strategy envisages such tools providing, among other things, much-needed transparency and evidence of value for money to taxpayers, while providing the MoJ with key information to make strategic decisions on its asset portfolio, to innovate, and to continually improve. Surely, many other client organisations will want to reap similar benefits?

FM

 Jacqueline Walpole, Company Product Manager at FSI (FM Solutions)

The second keynote came from FSI’s Jacqueline Walpole. She recalled how many FMs were once a paper-based afterthought: typically, for the client or owner-operator, the completion of a built asset was followed, nine months later, by the handover of a large paper-based archive of information, much of it in paper-based form, some of it already out-of-date. Computer-aided FM (CAFM), therefore, often tended to start from scratch. Digitising design, construction, commissioning and handover processes, she said, opens up the prospect of a digital flow of information into FM (“keeping the BIM live”), achieving operational readiness almost instantly, and Jacqueline highlighted the publication of a new BIFM guide (available here) to achieving such readiness, which includes an EIR template.

The two short keynotes, therefore, promoted readily available toolkits, guides and templates showing how BIM can be applied to support FM, and, in so doing, to enhance the roles of facilities managers. Two of the afternoon’s roundtable workshop sessions also underlined the potential value of data to help managers improve the performance of their assets and to connect their built asset’s data with valuable data held in other systems, but recurring themes about people and silo cultures also surfaced.

Roundtable discussion

Jacqueline Walpole chaired one of the roundtables I attended, getting delegates to consider, first, consider what data might be needed to support asset operations (with a nod to ‘lean’ thinking: “if in doubt, ask the caretaker – what are their ‘must haves’?”), and how some data schemas manage simple issues such as floor-numbering. Secondly, we talked about how in-service performance data might be used to support asset management. Applying analogies including cars and jet engines, we talking about creating and maintaining a built asset’s “service history,” and using the data generated by different building systems’ sensors to improve reliability and energy efficiency. Just as Rolls-Royce routinely collates huge volumes of data from every engine and flight as a basis for meeting its customers’ service level agreements, so facilities managers could collate and analyse built environment data (energy use, temperature, humidity, heating, lighting, equipment use, etc, over time) to support post-occupancy evaluation, optimize lifecycle cost efficiency, and – for ‘repeat clients’ – provide data to help them collaborate with design teams to improve the planning, design, construction and operation of future built assets.

GroupBC’s Steve Crompton led a roundtable pondering trust issues and other reasons why construction project teams have tended to re-key rather than re-use data. Conflicting standards, industry inertia and resistance to major people and process-related changes quickly cropped up. Old attitudes of ‘knowledge is power’ need to be overcome, as does distrust of ‘other people’s data’ (“We don’t trust digital data yet, because we haven’t moved on from distrusting paper information, or stuff off the web”). This workshop also highlighted some of the messages from the 1 June ThinkBIM ‘twilight’ event (link here) – semantic web technologies can help connect data about built assets to other data about the environment and about social aspects of the areas around those built assets. However, security, commercial confidentiality and personal privacy concerns all need to be addressed in selecting what data might be shared and used.

Feedback from all the workshops was shared, after which delegates heard a ‘RetroBIM’ case study from BIM Academy’s Graham Kelly, relating to the compilation of data to support improvement works undertaken at Sydney Opera House in Australia. That a UK-based firm led this project is another indication of how UK BIM experience is prized by clients worldwide, and there is clearly potential for UK FM businesses to similarly become world leaders in applying BIM to FM.

The conference, well chaired by NBS’s Stephen Hamil, showcased some of the standards and guidance now available, talked about the return on investment (ROI), but also – unlike some software vendors mentioned by Graham (“BIM software companies have raised uninformed expectations”) – highlighted it is not a simple technological change. ‘Silo cultures’ and ‘change management’ were two of the key risks on Graham’s project, and they apply equally to the wider adoption of BIM, and not just by the FM community.

BIM and FM. Are we winning yet?

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On the 3rd of June we welcomed around 40 industry professionals to Old Broadcasting House at Leeds Beckett University for the second twilight seminar of our summer series exploring the links between BIM and Facilities Management. We were thrilled to see many new faces in the room with nearly fifty percent of the attendees from a FM background which was a huge  increase from our 2014 asset managemet series where only a smattering of individuals raised their hand during our straw poll of FM professionals in the room.

Progress for thinkBIM then but is that reflected in the FM industry and their adoption of BIM? These were the key questions and themes explored by our two speakers, Mark Whittaker from BIFM North & Integral UK & Martin Ward from Styles and Wood & iSite. The title of this write-up was inspired by this series of tweets after the event which neatly summarises where our seminar showed the FM industry was at, some traction finally but still work to go.

 

This great slide from Martin Ward particularly resonated (and not just for the Bowie references). What needs to ch-ch-change for BIM adoption in FM to happen?

ccchange

Our full storify of the event including the live tweets & links is below. Have a read and tell us what you think? Where do you think the FM industry is and where does it need to go?

Please note that if you would like to see a copy of the slides from either of our presenters please email ckeevents@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

Join us for GreenBIM on 1st July!

We will be continuing discussions around these themes at our greenBIM conference on 1st July at Squire Patton Boggs in Leeds. For that event we are thrilled to have our International Keynote delivered by Bill East, the owner of Prairie Sky Consulting and one of the foremost authorities on COBie. Our UK keynote will be delivered by Nitesh Magdani, Director of Sustainability at BAM Construct UK who will present on the themes of BIM, the links to sustainability and the whole life cycle of projects. As usual we will be running our highly successful and often evocative round table discussions and will be rounding off with our new Room 101 feature which will be an opportunity for attendees to get off their chest their pet peeves  about BIM and sustainability. What needs to go to room101 to move our industry forward. Full details and booking here

GreenBim returns on 1st April

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photo 4 (6)

Squire Patton Boggs, (UK) LLP, 2 Park Lane, Leeds LS3 1ES,

Wednesday 1st April 2015, 13:00 to 17:30

Following on from our first very successful GreenBIM conference in December (read all about it here), thinkBIM and Green Vision are pleased to bring you our second digitally sustainable event focusing on the Construction and Assembly phase of the project lifecycle.

This knowledge packed afternoon will discuss practical strategies, techniques, and real-life case studies demonstrating how BIM can be used by project teams on construction sites to achieve better, more sustainable, outcomes for buildings and their occupants.

This not-to-be-missed event will offer presentations, workshops, quick fire Pecha Kuchas and the opportunity to network with other delegates over great food and a pint of Yorkshire real ale.

We are pleased to announce our keynote speakers:-

Anne Kemp   Director from Atkins Global who will be talking about behavioural change; how to plan for it, how to do it and how BIM makes this all possible

and

Richard Watson – Executive Director at RIBA Enterprises will be presenting the NBS Digital toolkit and explaining classification; two of the last major planks for Level 2

Our chair for the afternoon will be Su Butcher @SuButcher– Just Practising, the first lady of all things social media in construction!

 

Order of the Day

13:00 Registration
13:10 Chair Welcome
13:15 Keynote Speakers Anne Kemp – Director from Atkins GlobalRichard Watson – Executive Director at RIBA Enterprises
13:45 Roundtable Discussion Session A
14:45 Refreshments Break
15:00 Roundtable Discussion Session B
16:00 International Keynote Speaker –  Dr James Harty – Copenhagen School of Design & Technology
16:30 Pecha Kucha Showcase: Presentations with a twist; only 20 slides are allowed and they are auto-advanced every 20 seconds. There is very little scope for ‘Death by PowerPoint’ and they provide very engaging and creative presentations. If you would like to submit one for this event please get in touch with us.
17:00 Question Panel
17:30 Networking with BIM beers and food sponsored by Rapid 5D

 

About our roundtables

april1roundtables
Bookhere

sponsors

 

 

Thought-provoking presentations, lively debate & #bimbeers at last Wednesday’s #TBIM2015

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Wednesday 4th March saw the second event in our thinkBIM Construction and Assembly series, a twilight seminar on BIM 4 Manufacturers in conjunction with BIM4M2 task group. The event featured three presentations and a lively Q & A session which generated much debate & further discussion to take forward to future thinkBIM events.

The full presentations (slides & vocal) from the event are available to view at the link below. Please note, the feed has been edited in parts due to protection of sensitive information.

CLICKHERETOVIEW

Please also check out our storify of the event below, summarising the best tweets of the evening

Our next event on 1st April is our #GreenBIM half-day conference featuring  presentations on behavioural change, an update on the NBS Digital Toolkit, a quick fire pecha kucha session and much much more! More info and booking here

Many thanks as always to our supporters

thinkbimsponsors

BSI BIM Conference 2nd December 2014 #BISBIM2014

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Write-up by thinkBIM ambassador, Duncan Reed (@djhreed67)

On December 2nd I wandered along the banks of the Thames, through a very damp London to my second BSI BIM Conference. It had been twelve months since I last attended and BSI has been very busy publishing BIM guidance in the shape of PAS 1192-3:2014 and BS 1192-4:2014 not to mention the even more recent announcement of PAS 1192-5 for Data Security and the fact that our chair, Richard Waterhouse, is also in charge of the NBS-led consortia charged with delivering the Digital Plan of Works and ‘completing’ classification in the form of Uniclass2. But those two little tasks were for another day.

As is traditional for the start of any UK BIM Conference the proceeding opened with Dave Philp (@thephilpster) Director of BIM at Aecom and BIM Task Group, setting the scene, reviewing progress to date and outlining the brave journey into Level 3 – sometime.

davephilppresentationImage from David Philp presentation

Our second speaker was Anne Kemp (@ACKEMPO), Director, BIM Strategy and Development at Atkins for some fantastic, informative, telling and challenging words on BIM as behavioural change. If BIM really is 80% people and process; 20% technology it does make me wonder why we don’t have more people like Anne explaining how to manage this seismic shift in the way construction should be managed and delivered. If you get an opportunity to hear her speak my advice is grab the chance. If you can’t then read this book she recommended – Mind Change: How digital technologies are leaving their mark on our brains by Susan Greenfield.

 

annekemppresentation-cropped

Image from Anne Kemp presentation

After Anne I heard my first ever ‘Security Issues in BIM’ presentation by Alex Luck, Principal of A Luck Associates. BIM may be all about collaboration and sharing but what happens if the data gets into the wrong hands. Some real challenges here for the industry to grapple with – particularly when some are still trying to hold onto data rather than even share in the first place. I hope data security doesn’t get hijacked as a reason by some not to do BIM. The PAS 1192-5 draft for consultation is due out early in the New Year.

Before our first coffee break we were treated to an overview of the 1192 family by Mervyn Richards, OBE, and Director of Avanti Partnership. Merv gave a great review of where we have come, what we’ve achieved and what is still to be done. Key message from him –

“You can’t do Level 2 yet – all the documents aren’t yet in place!”

Coffee break over and we returned to our fourth floor basement business suite to hear Paul Oakley (@OakleyCAD), Associate Director BIM at the BRE explain what the BRE has to offer individuals and businesses for BIM training and support. But Level 2 certification? Hmmm.

Next up was my old Balfour Beatty Group friend Andy Powell (@ajbpow), Head of Building Information Modelling at Parsons Brinckerhoff. Andy gave a great overview on how a business needs to define BIM goals as well as frameworks for a Digital Strategy. PB have adopted the hashtag #digitalpotential More information at their website (and the video) http://pbworld.com/digitalpotential/

 

andykemppresentation

Image from Andy Powell presentation

Rob Manning gave a great overview on PAS 192-3 and in particular the role of the client whilst David Churcher provided some really useful examples of how this document can be implemented. His examples of what Organisational Information Requirements (OIRs) might actually look like were really useful.

davechurcherpresentation

Image from David Churcher presentation

Keeping up?……… just about but fortunately we all had an opportunity to break for lunch, network, or just catch up with BIM colleagues.

Two o’clock and we were all back in our chairs to here Jon Kerbey, Head of Management Systems on HS2 and the man charged with delivering BIM on this scheme. HS2 has already published a BIM Upskilling report this year and Jon outlined some of the finding. Have to say they sound optimistic to my mind but let’s hope UK construction really does rise the challenge of delivering HS2. Their full report can be found at http://assets.hs2.org.uk/sites/default/files/HS2%20Supply%20Chain%20BIM%20Upskilling%20Study%2013-06-14.pdf

After Jon we were treated, and I use the word wisely, to a shock and awe presentation worthy of Dave Philp or even Paul Morell. Nigel Davies  (@NigelPDavies), Director at Evolve, pulled no punches in de-mystifying, de-bunking and generally giving BIM a good roughing up. But in particular businesses over-complicating BIM and over-stating their abilities were his key targets. Let’s get Level 1 right, a sentiment that has been echoed less vocally by previous speakers too. His statistics on where construction think they are, and where they actually are, on the Bew-Richards BIM wedge put me in mind of the BIM analogies with teenage sex.

BIM is like teenage sex

Everyone talks about it…

Nobody really knows how to do it

Everyone thinks everyone else is doing it

So everyone claims they are doing it!

The final speaker the delegates were treated too, after another dose of caffeine and cake, was Nic Nisbet @nicknisbet – the personification of COBie for the UK(?). Nic gave a great overview of the recently published BS1192-4 Code of Practice in his usual dry manner. Also good to hear that COBie for Infrastructure guidance/case studies are due out soon too.

All the days Twitter events have been captured by the Storify link below  https://storify.com/djhreed67/bsi-bim-conference-london-2nd-december-2014

But the last part of the day was handed over to the delegates for a group discussion session. We were split into 5 groups and asked to review the following questions

15.50 – 16.30 Table discussions

How to improve the effectiveness of processes on projects?

How would you promote BIM as a natural progression within the organisation?

Commitment to BIM – what do we need to do – BIM shopping list

So with a group of about 19 we attempted to answer these questions in the time allowed. What did we end up with? A wide-ranging BIM discussion, pretty much around these points but not necessarily being focussed enough to answer the questions, ensued. Despite not having my trusty bundle of Sharpies from last year I was voted in (??) as Group 3 scribe and presenter.

So, in the true style of BIM as a disruptive technology I amended questions to better fit the answers we were identifying.

How to improve the effectiveness of processes on projects?

How would you promote BIM as a natural progression within the organisation?

Commitment to BIM – what do we need to do – BIM shopping list

So re-focussing the question to an answer of

Improve processes, promote BIM (get) commitment

But as a more full answer and summary of discussions we came up with the following response for our Chair, Richard Waterhouse.

  • It’s all about people – and businesses need to determine who is best placed in their business to deliver BIM (it’s not necessarily the IT Manager – remember BIM is a process not technology)
  • We are looking at a paradigm shift, we can’t just tinker around the edges – a great point made by Andy Powell, Parsons Brinckerhoff, in his presentation earlier in the day.
  • Change needs to start with the individual, a person needs to want to change in the first instance. But change also needs to happen at all levels with business leaders giving leadership
  • Businesses need to understand, and address, the fear of change. Change management is vital for BIM to succeed.

Nigeldaviestweet-cropped

  • Businesses need to identify problems, they are normally too quick to offer solutions.
  • Businesses also need to learn to work better with new tools; but these tools need to be appropriate!!
  • Businesses also need to plan for change a long time before the change is going to occur. You just can’t rock up for a project start up meeting and expect to deliver BIM. Also remember that one size most definitely does not fit all – solve the issues not the symptoms.
  • Be aware that some changes will happen so rapidly that there is no time to consider them – let them happen!
  • Still be mindful of commercial realities. The group had a long discussion on the (usual) subject of Capex and Opex. But still very valid at present for the industry. Get the Capex and Opex trams together, shake them up and bring out the best from them both. Don’t think of projects, think of assets, in fact don’t even think of assets think of portfolios. But when thinking this way people and businesses still need to ensure that the micro and macro scales are still aligned.
  • BIM is business transformation – as an industry we all manage projects, BIM is ‘just’ another project to manage.

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