Category: Conference

ThinkBIM returns with BIM for logistics/planning & best of UK BIM, BIM Alliance collaborative conference

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thinkBIM returns for our 6th year, yes 6 – we’ve been going as long at the Government BIM Strategy itself! To celebrate, we are pleased to offer two really great and innovative events.

Not just 4D, Digital Logistics & Planning too

(Twilight Seminar) Wednesday 1st November 2017, 17:30 registration & refreshments, 18:00 to 19:30

Rose Bowl, RB538 Lecture Theatre D, Leeds

For a long time the basic idea of 4D BIM has been well understood by the construction industry but other than running an animation of the construction sequence what can you really do when you add time to a model?

Three very different views will be presented on the broader benefits of digital planning and logistics processes, a tool for helping the rail industry to validate possessions programmes and how the demolition industry is embracing BIM.

Speakers

Professor Terrence Fernando, ThinkLab, University of Salford

Lee Mullin, Autodesk

Kiran Rai, The Coleman Group

£25 per ticket

The best of UK BIM – the UK BIM Alliance

(Half Day Conference) Wednesday 6th December 2017

12:00 lunch and registration, 13:00 to 17:30

 Squire Patton Boggs, 6 Wellington Pl, Leeds

thinkBIM – the home of the Yorkshire and Humberside BIM Region, the UK BIM Alliance and the BIM4Communities come together to give you the widest overview of UK digital adoption you could ever wish to hear about.

With keynote presentations from the UK BIM Alliance, the Government Task Group and roundtables hosted by the BIM4Communities delegates will get a fantastic opportunity to understand what best-in-class looks like, the challenges these interest groups are facing and the support that is available to you from your peers.

Speakers

Anne Kemp, Chair, UK BIM Alliance

Fiona Moore, UK Government BIM Task Group

+ representatives from BIM 4 Communities groups

Willmott Dixon will also present on the National High Speed Rail College project in Doncaster, the winner of 2017 Constructing Excellence Yorkshire and Humber Digital Construction Award

£80 per ticket

BOOKINGS

Book for either or both events via our online store

Click here to book!

SPONSOR THESE EVENTS

Interested in sponsoring one or both of these events? Contact ckeevents@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

Half Day Conference: thinkBIM not droning on -5th April 2017

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  ThinkBIM Construction and Assembly 2017

BIM Conference – thinkBIM not droning on

Wednesday 5th April 2017, Leeds
12:00 for registration and lunch, 13:00 to 17:30

Our spring season conference gives delegates a fantastic opportunity to see and try out augmented reality gear, scanning equipment and robotic setting out devices.

We have a great keynote speech from Scott Grant, from Soluis Group, about the use of visualisations, immersive environments and specialist Apps to bring data to life for project teams.

In addition there will be roundtable sessions from our sponsors SES Engineering Services, from BAM Construction and demonstrations from Central Alliance and Trimble MEP.

We think we’ve got a great line up presenting on data capture and interpretation so why not join us on the 5th April to find out about the latest technology for interacting with digital construction.

 


Squire Patton Boggs, Leeds

 Click here to book your place! 

 

ThinkBIM Security – 7th December 2016

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December 2016’s ThinkBIM was particularly memorable for an eye-opening and occasionally frightening view of just how vulnerable the built environment might be to cyber attack, writes Paul Wilkinson of pwcom and thinkBIM Steering Group member.

In May 2015, PAS1192-5 – “Specification for security-minded building information modelling, digital built environments and smart asset management” – became the latest addition to the suite of UK BIM documents, and Turner & Townsend’s Nathan Jones gave us the benefit of a non-construction person’s view of this document. Nathan was recruited into the construction industry after working in the armed forces specialising in military grade IT and security-related technologies.

From his presentation and roundtable contributions, it was clear that he felt existing construction industry IT practices lag behind most other industry sectors in respect of security (“Often IT security is a bit backward in construction”).

This is, of course, hardly surprising. Within the living memory of many people still working in the sector, we mostly exchanged information by paper. But now, in the early years of the 21st century, we are increasingly sharing ‘electronic paper’ – emails instead of letters, Word documents instead of typed reports, PDFs or native files instead of drawings, etc. We already must be vigilant about security: guarding against software viruses, ‘phishing’, hacking, and theft or loss of devices, while also continuing to track, store and protect our communications and intellectual property. (And not always successfully: details of the internal layout of a Royal Palace were recently freely distributed to potential tenderers via an email attachment, Nathan said.)

However, the next stages in the digital transformation of the built environment sector are set to make information management more challenging from a security point of view.

 

From BIM to BASM

As firms begin to share and to combine or ‘federate’ data-rich 3D, 4D (time) and 5D (cost) models, project teams will need to heighten their cyber-security regimes.

A shared 3D model may expose intellectual property to competitors. Moreover, a walk-through visualisation of a new building might expose sensitive information about the building’s design – key structural components, locations of key building services, placement of CCTV or other security equipment, for example. Shared 4D models might reveal periods when assets might be susceptible to sabotage or sites could be vulnerable to theft, while a 5D model could reveal commercially sensitive pricing information to competitors.

Published by the British Standards Institute and the Centre for Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI), PAS1192-5 is intended to help teams identify and guard against risks including:

  • hostile reconnaissance
  • malicious acts
  • loss or disclosure of intellectual property
  • loss or disclosure of commercially sensitive information, and
  • release of personally identifiable information.

And our already abbreviation-heavy glossary of BIM terms now includes BASM – built asset security management – as a new discipline. Early engagement with a BAS manager will help a project team and the asset owner develop a strong built asset security strategy (BASS) and management plan (BASMP), said Nathan.

People can be our greatest asset, but also our weakest link

Such measures will become more important in an increasingly connected world of not just ‘smart buildings’ but ‘Smart Cities’. We will need to protect information created during delivery of a new built asset, and – just as importantly, and depending on the asset’s sensitivity – protect some or all of the data created by the people and systems in and around that asset, and in any connected assets or infrastructure.

At the people level, precautions might include procedures limiting information access to those with defined roles (I was encouraged that Nathan identified that some Software-as-a-Service collaboration platforms do this well: restricting access to certain files, models or data only to people with defined responsibilities), supported by systems of passes, logins, keys or other forms of authentication.

 

BASM – it’s about people

As with other aspects of BIM, this is certainly not just about technology, but people and process. Awareness raising and training will be important: working practices learned in the days of paper or “spray and pray” email will need to be amended, and data vulnerabilities addressed. Often the weak link will not be the software or hardware, but the people that use them (users noting passwords and PINs on Post-It notes next to their computers, for example), and, as risks cannot be entirely eliminated, Nathan also advised that organisations need plans and processes dictating how they will respond to security breaches.

In one of the roundtable sessions, John Lorimer asked Nathan if this heightened focus on security might counteract recent years’ efforts to get companies and people to share information more readily. “Security should not stop collaboration, so long as it is controlled and people are aware,” Nathan replied, “BIM is actually helping to trigger some security-minded conversations much earlier. We may soon be segmenting our construction supply chains according to those who are security-aware, and those who aren’t.”

 

BIM for FM – still not quite there….

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Paul Wilkinson

Guest post by Paul Wilkinson, thinkBIM ambassador and Director, pwcom.co.uk Ltd

ThinkBIM focused on FM, and provided detailed pointers to FM professionals on both how to get involved with BIM, and why it makes commercial sense.

The latest ThinkBIM half-day conference (on 6 July at Squire Patton Boggs new offices in Leeds, and sponsored by Trimble and GroupBC) looked, once again, at the use of building information modelling by those working in facilities management, operations and maintenance for owner-operator organisations, and yet – on a show of hands – only a small handful of attendees were actually employed in FM. The day therefore repeatedly returned to what government and industry needs to do to get more FM professionals engaged with BIM.

Keynotes

The business case for BIM has been well made by the UK Government’s BIM Task Group since 2011, and regular ThinkBIM keynote speaker Deborah Rowland (currently director of FM at the Ministry of Justice) has been at the forefront in pushing the BIM for FM message in the public sector, citing Government Soft Landings (GSL). She underlined how asset management is fundamental to BIM-enabled project delivery, with client facilities managers involved from a project’s inception in helping to define the employer’s information requirements (EIR) and asset information management (AIM) needs.

PAS 1192-3 covering information management in the operational phase was published in March 2014, and since then advice, standards and protocols covering FM inputs to BIM and beyond have expanded. Deborah highlighted recent useful additions, notably a RICS-developed NRM3 dLCC (digital lifeycle cost) toolkit which aligns BIM with SFG20 maintenance information needs (more about SFG20 here). The MoJ’s BIM2AIM group also recently launched a suite of documents providing clear and concise instruction and guidance on how to define, procure and deliver Level 2 BIM projects (read BIM+ news).

The MoJ’s strategy envisages such tools providing, among other things, much-needed transparency and evidence of value for money to taxpayers, while providing the MoJ with key information to make strategic decisions on its asset portfolio, to innovate, and to continually improve. Surely, many other client organisations will want to reap similar benefits?

FM

 Jacqueline Walpole, Company Product Manager at FSI (FM Solutions)

The second keynote came from FSI’s Jacqueline Walpole. She recalled how many FMs were once a paper-based afterthought: typically, for the client or owner-operator, the completion of a built asset was followed, nine months later, by the handover of a large paper-based archive of information, much of it in paper-based form, some of it already out-of-date. Computer-aided FM (CAFM), therefore, often tended to start from scratch. Digitising design, construction, commissioning and handover processes, she said, opens up the prospect of a digital flow of information into FM (“keeping the BIM live”), achieving operational readiness almost instantly, and Jacqueline highlighted the publication of a new BIFM guide (available here) to achieving such readiness, which includes an EIR template.

The two short keynotes, therefore, promoted readily available toolkits, guides and templates showing how BIM can be applied to support FM, and, in so doing, to enhance the roles of facilities managers. Two of the afternoon’s roundtable workshop sessions also underlined the potential value of data to help managers improve the performance of their assets and to connect their built asset’s data with valuable data held in other systems, but recurring themes about people and silo cultures also surfaced.

Roundtable discussion

Jacqueline Walpole chaired one of the roundtables I attended, getting delegates to consider, first, consider what data might be needed to support asset operations (with a nod to ‘lean’ thinking: “if in doubt, ask the caretaker – what are their ‘must haves’?”), and how some data schemas manage simple issues such as floor-numbering. Secondly, we talked about how in-service performance data might be used to support asset management. Applying analogies including cars and jet engines, we talking about creating and maintaining a built asset’s “service history,” and using the data generated by different building systems’ sensors to improve reliability and energy efficiency. Just as Rolls-Royce routinely collates huge volumes of data from every engine and flight as a basis for meeting its customers’ service level agreements, so facilities managers could collate and analyse built environment data (energy use, temperature, humidity, heating, lighting, equipment use, etc, over time) to support post-occupancy evaluation, optimize lifecycle cost efficiency, and – for ‘repeat clients’ – provide data to help them collaborate with design teams to improve the planning, design, construction and operation of future built assets.

GroupBC’s Steve Crompton led a roundtable pondering trust issues and other reasons why construction project teams have tended to re-key rather than re-use data. Conflicting standards, industry inertia and resistance to major people and process-related changes quickly cropped up. Old attitudes of ‘knowledge is power’ need to be overcome, as does distrust of ‘other people’s data’ (“We don’t trust digital data yet, because we haven’t moved on from distrusting paper information, or stuff off the web”). This workshop also highlighted some of the messages from the 1 June ThinkBIM ‘twilight’ event (link here) – semantic web technologies can help connect data about built assets to other data about the environment and about social aspects of the areas around those built assets. However, security, commercial confidentiality and personal privacy concerns all need to be addressed in selecting what data might be shared and used.

Feedback from all the workshops was shared, after which delegates heard a ‘RetroBIM’ case study from BIM Academy’s Graham Kelly, relating to the compilation of data to support improvement works undertaken at Sydney Opera House in Australia. That a UK-based firm led this project is another indication of how UK BIM experience is prized by clients worldwide, and there is clearly potential for UK FM businesses to similarly become world leaders in applying BIM to FM.

The conference, well chaired by NBS’s Stephen Hamil, showcased some of the standards and guidance now available, talked about the return on investment (ROI), but also – unlike some software vendors mentioned by Graham (“BIM software companies have raised uninformed expectations”) – highlighted it is not a simple technological change. ‘Silo cultures’ and ‘change management’ were two of the key risks on Graham’s project, and they apply equally to the wider adoption of BIM, and not just by the FM community.

CIAT Professional Development Day

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CIAT 

Welcome to the second of our days of learning and opportunities for professional development that the Yorkshire Region of CIAT is hosting in conjunction with Leeds Beckett University. We continue to make freely available value added presentations given by knowledge rich presenters on topical subject areas within the construction industry; a collection of which we consider you could not find anywhere else.

 

Building on the unprecedented success of our inaugural event in June 2015, this year we have managed to secure the services of two speakers whose names are instantly recognisable as major players within the realm of UK building design and construction.

 

Peter Caplehorn will open the day with his Keynote presentation on the challenges that face the profession and the wider industry. If you have heard Peter speak before, or even if you haven’t, this is not one to miss. To get the day back on track after lunch Richard Saxon will offer his unique experienced brand in presenting how Building Information Modelling will be influencing a Digital Built Britain as we work towards level 3.

 

The full programme can be found at the following link http://ciat-yorkshire.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/CIAT%20Yorkshire%20Professional%20Development%20Day%2026%20May%202016.pdf

 

Our thanks go to our event supporters, RIBA, CIOB, RICS, CIBSE, CABE, ICE, and Centre for Knowledge Exchange at Leeds Beckett University. We also offer a big thank you to the event sponsors, without whom it could not happen; Knauf Insulation, Graphisoft, Beattie Passiv, LABC, Minerva Appointments, Leeds Beckett University and CIAT Yorkshire.

 

BOOKING DETAILS

 

Please book via the link below;

http://www.ciat-yorkshire.org.uk/events/professional-development-day/

 

What good BIM looks like: Round-up of #tbim2016 Spring Conference

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On Wednesday 23rd March we brought our thinkBIM Spring Series 2016 to a close with our sold-out half-day conference at WSP Offices in Leeds, looking at the best of BIM over the last five years and where the industry is in relation to the BIM Level 2 mandate. The event attracted over 60 people representing architects, clients, consultants and contractors all at various stages of their BIM journey and was chaired by long time thinkBIM ambassador, Stephen Hamil at RIBA Enterprises. Stephen has done his own excellent summary of the day over on his blog Construction Code which you can read here http://constructioncode.blogspot.co.uk/2016/03/think-bim-spring-conference-2016.html

Our first speaker was our UK keynote, David Philp. He was of course meant to be at the conference in person but his BIM duties took him overseas unexpectedly, so he did his presentation over the web, seamlessly (well almost), from a busy airport lounge in Perth. Dave gave a whistlestop overview of the last five years, reviewing the level 2 journey and the benefits it has brought to date. Dave will be making a recorded version of his presentation with slides which we will share on the blog as soon as we receive it.

CollageJamesAustin

James Austin, Then and now. From our scoping event in 2011 (left) to the present day (right).

Next up was James Austin, Product Manager at Autodesk and an original founding member of thinkBIM. James was also a speaker at the inaugural thinkBIM event nearly five years ago to the date of the conference. James delivered his personal overview of BIM over the last five years highlighting the landscape that BIM came about in, the development of the UK BIM task groups and its journey in line with policy and Construction 2025. Full of good stuff, you can watch and listen to the full presentation at the following link,

https://autodesk.box.com/s/rqr9ecf2c0nasa708huklqebib3rh69m .

tbim2016-Conf-33

Adam Matthews: EU BIM aim is to have a European digital single market for construction 2020

Following James we then welcomed Adam Matthews, Chair of the newly formed EU BIM Task Group who presented on the innovations that UK BIM has created and how that is now feeding into European BIM Strategy and EU guidelines on publically procured projects. It was clear from Adam’s presentation that BIM is an area where the UK has the potential to lead the rest of Europe. Adam’s full presentation can be viewed at the Issu link below.

After the presentations the groups convened for roundtable sessions, notes of which will be posted on the blog shortly. After our two roundtable sessions, the conference was brought to a close with a Q & A session featuring James and Adam and joined by Jason Richards from WSP and Tom Oulton from the Yorkshire and Humber BIM region. The Q & A raised a couple of reoccurring issues; i.e. software competition and compatibility, sharing and IP issues. However the consensus of the panel was that we need to share and get our information out there… principally because it’s probably out there anyway. Attendees were then treated to a well-earned BIM beer and curry provided by the excellent Friends for Dinner in Leeds. Thanks to our event hosts, WSP, network sponsors, Trimble Tekla, and our series sponsors, Exactal for all their support making Spring #tbim2016 a success.

FebSponsors

 with thanks to our sponsors and supporters

Our storify summary of the best tweets and images from the day can be found at the link below. In the meantime thinkBIM will return on 4th May with our summer series on FM and Operations. This series will feature twilight seminars on 4th May and 1st June as well as our half day conference on 6th July. Mark them in your diary now!

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