Tag: procurement

Defining Procurement Success (Joint event with CMI NEYH, CIBSE Yorkshire and Proxima)

Webster’s dictionary defines success in a fairly straight forward way – an accomplishment, or meeting of an aim or objective. Success in the procurement field, however, is a more nebulous concept. Perhaps that’s because procurement’s objectives aren’t usually clearly defined. Or perhaps, more accurately, it’s because procurement’s objectives are defined quite differently by its practitioners and the business leaders they serve.

Regardless of the sector in which you work this event will be of interest, being clear about what you want, regardless of whether equipment or service, is key to business success. This event will provide the opportunity to explore with experts in the field of procurement.

Join us for a discussion on procurement trends and how enlightened organisations are unlocking the hidden potential within their suppliers.

SPEAKERS

Andy Williamson is the Category Director for Property and FM services at Proxima, with over 30 years’ of experience as a commercial procurement practitioner working within the Construction, Defence, Education, Financial Services, Healthcare, Infrastructure, Leisure and Retail sectors. His team supports Clients property programme activities both nationally and internationally covering 126 million square feet and 11,000 properties.

Lex Henderson is a Procurement Specialist for Property and FM services at Proxima. Specialising in property, construction and facility management procurement, Lex has a broad spectrum of experience gained over 15 years’ experience within the Distribution, Financial Services, Healthcare, Infrastructure, Manufacturing, Leisure, Public and Retail sectors.

 

 

Clever Procurement = Collaboration, Integration and Communication, it’s not rocket science!

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On Wednesday 26th April 2017 we hosted another constructing excellence breakfast event at Addleshaw Goddard in Leeds, this time themed around procurement, in particular the roles and responsibilities of the clients, key considerations for those bidding for work and some of the crucial behaviours and processes behind successfully winning tenders.

Always an important (and popular) topic, we welcomed around 30 individuals to the event; principally contractors, subcontractors and architects, however it was also nice to see a number of clients in the room. We believe clients are key to driving improvement in our industry so the more we can provide platforms and encourage them to share experiences and learn from each other for the benefit of the industry, the better!

Our first speaker was Cliff Jones, Head of Construction Procurement Team with the commercial division at the Department of Health (DH) UK. Cliff has been working with DH procurement for over twenty years, including developing and implementing the DH ProCure21+ and now P22 frameworks. Cliff talked principally about setting realistic budgets and programmes from the outset and the importance of full supply chain collaboration and integration. He also emphasized client expectations in terms of issues/problems and risks that arise, i.e. the need for early warning protocols and communication – the DH in particular have a huge issue with correcting defects following handover due to the presence of key end users (clinical staff and patients) and therefore good aftercare is crucial. Cliff’s presentation was full of useful advice and tips for all attendees wherever you are in the build process.

Then onto Philip Collard. Philip is Managing Director of Marketing Works Training and Consultancy Ltd and CEO of myConsole a digital platform that provides bidding analytics, real-time bidding analytics based on potentially widespread and disparate datasets held by a business internally. This was not a sales pitch, Philip was actually here to share his insights into the importance of an organised and unified bidding process and how digitisation, data collection and analysis can support this. He then went on to talk about how companies can then leverage the knowledge and efficiencies this process gives to develop winning bid strategies. As always, the central theme to this presentation was collaboration, integration of process and people and the importance of data and feedback & how we can use digital to facilitate this.

Slightly veering into thinkBIM territory here but one final thought from Philip, how far ahead do we think the industry is in terms of digitisation… one above farming apparently (see slide above). Hold that thought.

All the presentation slides are listed below along with our storify from 26th May collating the best images, tweets and comments from the event.

Our next event will be on Wednesday 24th May and is a joint event with RIBA where we will hear the findings from the RIBA Client Liaison Group’s ground-breaking ‘Working with Architects’ survey and debate critical issues in the client-architect relationship. More details and booking here.

 

Everyone’s a winner – creating social value in construction

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On the last Wednesday of October we hosted the second of this autumn’s constructing excellence breakfasts broadly themed around the 8 stages of the RIBA plan of works (RIBAPOW). In this session we explored social sustainability aspirations and how to identify, measure and put in place tools to monitor them, in line with Stage 1 of the RIBAPOW, Preparation and Brief.

First up to speak was Rob Wolfe, Executive Director at Renew who introduced his proposal for the new national Constructing Excellence social value task group which is being developed alongside CEYH. The group will sit under the wider Constructing Excellence procurement group (which coincidently next meets in our region on 8th December) with the aim of providing a forum to share best practice and provide practical advice and guidance to clients, contractors and central government on how to embed social value into construction projects.

The next step for the task group is to determine membership which will be done via an open call for expressions of interest. Once membership has been identified, the group will agree terms of reference and then identify three specific tasks to work on initially. Anybody who is interested in being involved should contact Rob via rob.wolfe@renew-leeds.co.uk .

Rob then went on to talk about the work Renew have done in assisting regional businesses to develop a social value strategy. He advocated the importance of developing realistic and measurable KPI’s tailored to the needs of the project which can be monitored and evaluated throughout the project lifecycle. One of the examples he gave was the work Renew Leeds carried out with BAM on the First Direct Arena in Leeds (more info on Renew’s website here http://www.renewleeds.co.uk/our-impact/case-studies/chy-case-study-leeds-arena-contract/ ). He also stressed the importance of mentoring, this should not be a parent-child relationship, both parties need to challenge each other along the way.

We then welcomed Ian Chapman, Regional Manager from Britcon who presented an excellent case study on how their social value strategy has evolved and its application to 3 to 4 current developments, including a project with our own Leeds Beckett University. Ian started his presentation by stating that traditionally their social value strategy has been driven by Considerate Contractors Scheme but they have since built up greater awareness from working with Renew and by being involved with frameworks, such as YorBuild, that have identify specific social value aspirations. This illustrated to me the important role that clients have in driving the improvement agenda for social value. Ian gave some great examples of where Britcon have set, met and exceeded social value KPIs on projects including;

  • Increased collaboration with supply chain on Tropical World development by 113%
  • Exceeded work experience targets by 400%
  • Increased engagement with local schools and colleges

Ian then went on to describe how Britcon are using their experience on these developments in other projects and perhaps most significantly how there has been a shift at Britcon from obligation (doing social value because our clients want it) to doing because they see real tangible benefits for their business and the wider community. This was a great presentation from Ian showing just how much can be achieved by just deciding to ‘DO’ and I think we can all learn something from that.

All the presentations can be viewed in our storify summary of the workshop below along with the best tweets and images from the session.

Our next event on 25th November will be looking at Stage 2 of RIBA plan of works and is all about specifications – Starting to Specify the Specifics of your Spec (try saying that after a few #BIMbeers!) Further details and booking here  

Procurement is a process – buying is an output

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HEA STEM: Procurement Frameworks; Learning and teaching issues and solutions for contemporary practice

Over thirty delegates from a cross section of academia, post graduate part time students, construction professionals and client organisations (NHS) were brought together at a HEA STEM funded workshop to explore the learning and teaching issues surrounding Procurement, with a focus on the importance of employer engagement and real life case study evidence leading to better engagement and enhanced student experience in Higher Education .

The seminar was focussed on Procurement Practice in the construction industry. The academic members of staff presented their real experiences of procurement practice from an SME perspective whilst leading professionals offered their contractor and client side perspectives on procurement practice with an excellent case study presentation of by the Olympic Delivery Authority as an exemplar case study of best practice procurement. 

The event started with an overview of the HEA and potential funding streams available and continued with the academic perspective of procurement practice within the construction sector with evidence from both cutting edge sme research and engagement to practitioner case study presentations from the Olympic Delivery Authority and the NHS Procure21

David Woolley acting as the chair for the seminar, guided delegates through a series of presentations encouraging and facilitating debate and discussion. 

The Procurement Conference  examined the issues in procurement and construction in particular and how this might better inform Higher Education’s approaches to supporting new graduates and post graduates in this ‘post Latham and Egan reports’ world. 

To do this practical research and exemplar case studies were presented to inform debate and discussion. Research included examining the actual experience of tier 2 & 3 suppliers in framework bidding and exemplar cases studies included the remarkable Olympic Park Construction Project presented by Head of Procurement on the programme Paul Dickinson from the Olympic Delivery Authority.

Cliff Jones demonstrated the principles he’d employed in the delivery of the NHS’s Procure21 approach.

What was clear is that the team working and supply chain integration proposed by Latham and Egan have enjoyed much support and variability in execution. A variance that sees world class examples like he Olympic programme and some efforts more reminiscent of what went before and inspired the White papers in the first instance. 

This discussion made the challenge and content required of Higher Education more clear. Partnering and supply chain perspectives it seems need to include the fundamental principles that lead to those contractual behaviours and not simply new (however clever) processes. 

Much was suggested around negotiation development and in particular the development of interest based negotiation (a problem solving approach) rather than positional bargaining which might be making the situation worse. 

Advantages accruing from integrated supply chain initiatives, so called “intelligent procurement” place great demands on disparate interacting teams to work collaboratively together and put in contract arrangements that facilitate that.  Clearly suggesting this becomes a consultative negotiation and not a “one person buys something” activity. 

Holding on to that idea in a testing project requires much understanding and a broader strategic perspective. It was agreed that the content of Higher Education courses in these professional areas needs to include: collaborative problem solving; interest based negotiation; strategic perspective; supply chain management principles. 

This learning from this HEA workshop will be taken forwards in the form of a collection of resources for both Academics and Student audiences which will be available to be accessed online This event formed part of a Higher Education Academy Special Interest Group which has been set up with specific outputs to deliver :

–       Develop practionner case studies of best practice on Frameworks/ Procurement Practice

–       Gather resources from the Procurement seminar and post online as resources for both lecturers and students (video footage Procurement Frameworks; Learning and teaching issues and solutions for contemporary practice  Video )

–       Create an online open Knowledge Exchange platform for the sharing of best practice and information (Via Linkedin and CKE Procure Blog  )

Outputs form this Special Interest group will be presented to the Higher Education Academy towards the end of July. We will look to continue the work of this Special Interest Group with continued support from academics and practionners across the UK , with regular thought pieces to be published online around the theme of Procurement Best Practice to be used as a resource for students , academic staff and construction professionals .